Archive | October, 2014

Your Personal Testimony is Personal

Mag tests

Notice the disclaimer.

Recently, somebody asked if they would get a company in trouble for telling people that a certain product helped them. The answer is no.

Personal testimonies are awesome and any company likes to hear rave reviews about their products. However, personal testimonies aren’t facts because they can’t be substantiated by science.  If person x says “product y helped with condition z.” That’s simply what that person believes.  It may be true. It may be false. It wasn’t studied in a controlled setting under laboratory conditions and we can’t know for sure. It’s simply personal opinion/belief. You can express your personal opinion about a product. That’s fine.

Let’s say, for example, you believe you achieved a health result by consuming a product. It is only natural to share your experiences with your fellow humans, but if you were to go around saying that a product cured a serious medical condition, the company that makes that product would likely disavow that claim because the claim could be unsubstantiated, misleading or false. This is especially true for products that aren’t considered medicine.

The FTC:

 Marketers of dietary supplements should be familiar with the requirements under both DSHEA and the FTC Act that labeling and advertising claims be truthful, not misleading and substantiated.

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