It is often said that worrying is using your imagination to create something you do not want.  And if you are familiar with the Universal Law of Attraction you understand that you get whatever you think about…whether you want it or not.

The Law of Attraction says:  That which is like unto itself, is drawn.  We are constantly attracting people, places, things, situations, and experiences into our lives through the thoughts we think and the emotions we feel.  So it makes sense that by worrying about something which hasn’t happened, or you have no control over, could actually be setting yourself up to attract into your life all those things you are worrying about!

According to Wikipedia, “Worry is thoughts, images and emotions of a negative nature in which mental attempts are madeto avoid anticipated potential threats.  As an emotion it is experienced as anxiety or concern about a real or imagined issue, usually personal issues such as health or finances or broader ones such as environmental pollution and social or technological change.”

So why do we worry and stress ourselves out so much?

Well, in a nutshell we live in stressful times.  All you have to do is watch, listen or turn on the news for what I call the ‘doom and gloom report’.  I think we’d all be much better off if the news we heard was good news and good stories instead of bad news and bad stories.  I know we need to stay informed, just take what they say on the news with a grain of salt and move on to happier things in your life.

You can either choose to look and react negatively at things, or decide to look and react positively at things, creating a happier today and tomorrow.  The choice is yours.  Remember the Law of Attraction…you attract what you think about whether you want it or not.  Worrying can lead to stress, which can lead to all sorts of health and health related issues.

So what can we do to reduce worrying and stress, or better yet avoid it in the first place?  There are many helpful steps we can take, and choices we can make, to reduce or help manage the stress in our lives.  Here are a few suggestions:

Exercise – regular exercise helps to decrease the production of stress hormones.  Studies are showing that exercise can help combat anxiety and depression, and help with sleep.  Walking, running, dancing, biking, hiking, swimming, gardening and yard work can all have a significant effect on decreasing stress levels.  Pick an activity that you love and have fun doing it.

Massage – getting a massage is not only a great way to pamper ourselves, but can also help to decrease the stress hormone cortisol in our body.

Deep Breathing – can help calm the nerves.  Relax in a comfy chair and take a few deep breaths to help clear the mind.  Deep breathing also works well in any stressful situation.

Meditation and Relaxation Techniques – are known to have lasting and beneficial effects on health, as does yoga.

Take Time to Unwind – one of the key elements in reducing stress is taking the time for ourselves.  Read a good book, watch a movie, take time for a hobby, or have a nice relaxing soak in the bathtub.  Say ‘yes’ to yourself.

Rest – getting enough sleep helps our body and mind rejuvenate and better equips us to handle any negative stressors that may come along.  Seven to eight hours of uninterrupted rest is the required amount of sleep for most adults.

Diet – under stressful conditions our body needs healthful foods full of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients.  Junk foods, fast foods and highly processed foods are all stressors that can add to stress levels.  A healthy diet that includes fresh colorful vegetables and fruits, rich whole grains, unprocessed oils and fats, lean organic meats, dry beans, free-run eggs, nuts and seeds, organic low-fat dairy products, and clean water will provide most of the nutrition our body needs to help combat the effects of stress.

Laughter – learn to laugh at stressful situations that may arise.  A healthy dose of optimism can quickly turn a stressful circumstance into an opportunity for the better.  Sometimes, laughter really is the best medicine.

Nature has also provided us with many botanicals that can help strengthen our ability to cope with stress.  There are a variety of botanicals that work well to combat stress.  What I like to take when I’m feeling stressed out, anxious, or need help sleeping is AIM Composure®.

AIM Composure® is a combination of three soothing botanicals – valerian root, passionflower and hops flower (Canada).  These botanicals work synergistically to provide a safe and effective way to help relax and calm nerves and muscles, alleviate feelings of anxiety, reduce restlessness, and promote restful sleep.  All three botanicals in AIM Composure® have been approved in the Natural Health Product Directorate Monographs from Health Canada, and AIM Composure® has been issued a Natural Product Number (NPN).  An NPN indicates that Health Canada has assessed the product for its safety, claim, and quality, and has authorized it for sale in Canada.

We may not have a crystal ball to see into the future and make the right choices, but by becoming aware of how worry and stress impacts our lives and our health, and by learning to accept change and everyday challenges, we can reduce our worries and manage our stress.  Life is meant to be fun, and we are meant to live a joyful life.  Why worry?

“Today is the tomorrow we worried about yesterday.”
~Author Unknown

NoteAIM Composure® is also available in Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and USA.  The formulation in these countries differs slightly from Canada.

Click here to learn more about AIM Composure® download datasheets, watch videos, and make your purchase. As with any nutritional supplement it is always recommended to read the literature thoroughly to find out if the product is right for you, and consult your health care practitioner if you have any medical conditions or concerns.

Article by Joanne Jackson, CHN

*Relax Note With Pushpin Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/